IVC Filter Study
Many people who have been implanted with IVC (inferior vena cava) filters have experienced severe complications, with one of the worst being a tendency for the device to break, often impaling major organs with metal struts. Another major problem is tilting of the device, which can puncture the vena cava (a major artery) and cause blood clots.

According to a recent study, some IVC filter models tilt more than others.

Varied Results

Researchers originally conducted the study with a focus on the Bard Denali IVC filter and then expanded it to other models, primarily the Option filter from Rex Medical and a filter manufactured by ALN. They wanted to see which filters tilted during the retrieval process, which is typically recommended anywhere from 29-54 days after a filter is implanted. Retrieval is recommended after a patient is no longer at risk for a pulmonary embolism, which occurs when a blood clot travels from the legs to the lungs.

While the Denali tended not to tilt during retrieval, the Option filter did. This can lead to complications for patients, including more time on the operating table as well as the need for a more extensive procedure. This, in turn, can result in a substantially longer recovery period.

Taking Action

Patients who have suffered harm due to tilting or other types of blood clot filter malfunctions are filing IVC filter lawsuits across the country against various manufacturers. Two separate IVC filter litigations against Bard and Cook Medical have been consolidated into multidistrict litigation courts (MDLs) because of the high number of plaintiffs involved.

If you have been hurt due to an IVC filter complication, please get in touch with Baron & Budd for a confidential consultation as soon as you can. Complete our online form or call 866-731-7909 to learn more about your potential legal options.