Protecting Our Roads

As if weather conditions and careless drivers weren’t enough, we’re also put at risk every day by the companies that make our cars and the commercial trucks that drive alongside us. Our roads shouldn’t be the most dangerous place in America – and we’re fighting to change that.

In 2014, when airbag manufacturer Takata recalled its product from eight million vehicles, Baron & Budd was quick to act. Along with co-counsel, we filed the nation’s first lawsuit for monetary damages related to faulty airbags blamed for numerous deaths and injuries. In addition, we are steadfastly pushing for expedited discovery so that additional injuries can be avoided.

Cars made unsafe by negligence on the part of auto makers are a serious threat, but another danger is the increasing incidence of serious accidents involving large trucks.

As you read this, we are investigating other manufacturers’ negligence as well.

Was it thinkable, for instance, for GM to wait a decade before alerting drivers to the dangers of their faulty ignition switch, a small part allegedly responsible for a dozen deaths and hundreds of life-threatening collisions?

And was it right for Chrysler to opt out of recalling their nerve center defect – one they themselves have acknowledged led to at least 20 deaths?

Cars made unsafe by negligence on the part of auto makers are a serious threat – but not the only road hazard we face. Another danger is the increasing incidence of serious accidents involving large trucks.

In 2012 alone, more than 4,000 people died in truck and bus accidents and approximately 126,000 were injured. Trucking companies are often faulted for allowing and even encouraging drivers to engage in dangerous behaviors, such as speeding, driving in unsafe weather, skipping rest breaks and falsifying logbooks. And the trucking companies themselves have been too often negligent at performing basic vehicle maintenance or allowing unsecured or overweight loads.

Here’s the point: Protecting what’s right can’t be left in the hands of commercial interests alone. And while that’s a tall order, it’s one we’re up for every day.