AVON Anti-Aging Products

Baron & Budd P.C. is counsel for plaintiffs in a currently pending class action lawsuit against beauty company AVON regarding alleged misrepresentations made by the company concerning certain “anti-aging” products. The lawsuit addresses advertising and marketing surrounding AVON’s Anew line of products, including Anew Clinical Advanced Wrinkle Corrector, Anew Reversalist Night Renewal Cream, Anew Reversalist Renewal Serum, and Anew Clinical Thermafirm Face Lifting Cream products. Attorneys Roland Tellis and Mark Pifko represent the plaintiffs in the case.

This class action is the first lawsuit ever filed against AVON regarding the deceptive advertising of these products.

According to the lawsuit, Avon misled the public with claims about its various Anew products based on formulas that purportedly boost collagen production, recreate fresh skin and fortify damaged tissue. There are no scientifically reliable studies to support those claims, yet the marketing has induced consumers to pay premium prices for items that cannot deliver the benefits the company promises, the lawsuit states.

Specifically, the lawsuit alleges that “Avon used aggressive marketing to mislead consumers into believing that the Avon anti-aging products were bottled at the fountain of youth” and that “Avon preys upon consumers who fear the effects of aging and believe there are products that can make their skin and features youthful again, and halt or turn back the inevitable hands of time.”

In October 2012, the FDA issued a warning to AVON, saying that these anti-aging products have been misrepresented to consumers. The FDA demanded that AVON tone down the claims made about the products. According to the FDA’s warning, AVON’s anti-aging products “are not generally recognized among qualified experts as safe and effective” for the advertised uses. For a company to sell drugs, they would need FDA approval, which would require detailed testing and could take years.

AVON uses these false claims to take advantage of consumers and charge more money for their products, thus potentially cheating consumers out of thousands of dollars, the lawsuit states. In fact, just last year the beauty industry recorded almost $3 billion in profits for anti-wrinkle products.