Volunteers Help Protect Waterways From Wildfire Debris

December 19, 2017  |  Environmental, Wildfire

A team of devoted volunteers is working extremely hard to try to protect creeks and other waterways from debris created by the devastating Northern California wildfires. The Sonoma Ecology Center is targeting hundreds of properties damaged by the fires in order to keep toxic materials from going into creeks and streams as the rainy season begins.

A Noble Effort

Thousands of buildings were destroyed during the fires, which killed more than 40 people. As fall turns to winter, a new concern has developed – keeping the ash that currently sits on burned sites from moving into surrounding bodies of water. Rain can cause the ash to runoff into waterways, and wind can transport it into streams as well. This could pose a significant threat to fish as well as wildlife.

The volunteers, part of the Sonoma Ecology Center, are working to place bags filled with sand and gravel in the way of potential runoff areas. They are also using large bundles of straw known as wattles in an effort to stem the movement of ash. The team has protected an estimated 50 structures so far, but there are hundreds more to go.

The attorneys with California Fire Lawyers want to thank these volunteers for the incredible work they are doing to help protect the Sonoma County watershed. We are committed to fighting for the environment, and have pursued litigation across the country on behalf of municipalities that have suffered water contamination due to the negligence of huge corporations.

If you suffered losses due to the horrible Northern California wildfires, we may be able to help. Please contact us online or call 866-723-1890 to learn more or to schedule a confidential consultation.

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