Almost 400 scientists met last week to discuss the latest development in the research and testing of tainted Chinese drywall, which has been linked to corrosion in homes and is a suspected health hazard. The two-day conference took place in Tampa.

A scientist with a consultant for homebuilder Lennar Corp. described studies regarding elemental sulfur contained in the drywall reacting to carbon monoxide in the ambient air, which appears to cause a chemical reaction leading to the emission of carbon disulfide. Carbon disulfide emissions from Chinese drywall have been present in both privately funded and government studies.

Scientists from three federal agencies also reported on their preliminary findings to date. And representatives from Florida agencies researching the Chinese drywall problem spoke about their agencies’ work. An official with the Florida Department of Community Affairs described the possibility of a change to the Florida building code to address the problematic drywall. And an official with the Florida Department of Environmental Protection discussed recommendations that remediated drywall be disposed of in “Class I” landfills, which are covered daily to contain gases.

For the full story, go to Sarasota’s Herald Tribune.