Mesothelioma & Veterans: Asbestos Exposure in the U.S. Military

Our mesothelioma lawyers are proud to represent our nation’s heroes against the companies that knowingly put them at risk for mesothelioma and other asbestos-related diseases.

In the early 20th century, the U.S. military used large quantities of asbestos products due to their durability, low cost and heat resistance and fireproof capabilities until the products were eventually phased out in the 1970s. However, this has put many U.S. veterans at high risk of later developing an asbestos disease, such as mesothelioma or lung cancer.

Sadly, countless brave men and women in the armed services have been exposed to dangerous asbestos products through their military service.

Yet, it’s important to understand that our mesothelioma lawyers do not sue the military. Instead, we sue the asbestos companies that sold the products to the military, because it was the responsibility of these companies to disclose the harmful effects of their products. Instead, these companies chose to hide the truth about their products for fear of losing profits.

If you or your family member is a veteran and has been diagnosed with mesothelioma or another asbestos-related disease, we want to help. Call us at 1.866.855.1229 or contact us here.

Asbestos Exposure in the U.S. Navy

Asbestos was frequently used for decades in shipyards and in the production of Navy vessels. Because of this, a wide variety of people were affected within the Navy, even those involved in the construction, overhaul or repair of the ships were likely exposed to asbestos. Navy veterans who served aboard ships run a particularly high risk of being exposed to asbestos on Navy ships, especially when working near the ship’s engine room.

Navy veterans have been the most affected branch of the military, with many veterans being diagnosed with mesothelioma or other asbestos diseases. Our mesothelioma lawyers are proud to have represented numerous Navy veterans, including Admiral Elmo Zumwalt, Jr., who served as Chief of Naval Operations during the Vietnam War.

Asbestos Exposure in the U.S. Army

During much of the 20th century, many U.S. veterans were exposed to high levels of asbestos. The material has been found in more than 30 U.S Army installations and many troops were continually exposed to asbestos. Although the Army discontinued the use of asbestos in the construction new barrack installations in the late 70s, toxic fibers were still present in older installations.

If you served in the U.S Army and participated in duties such as mining, milling, pipefitting, insulation work, shipyard work, carpentry, demolition of old building and construction, flooring and roofing installation, you may have been exposed to harmful asbestos fibers.

Asbestos Exposure in the U.S. Marines

Veterans of the U.S Marine Corps have also been exposure to asbestos through airplanes, ships and armored vehicles that were used to transport soldiers during their service. Many Marines have also spent long periods of time on ships that used asbestos-containing products in the ships’ construction.

The Marines also share many facilities with the Navy as part of their service to our country. Because of this, Marines have been greatly affected by asbestos, resulting in diagnoses of mesothelioma and other asbestos diseases.

Marine veterans may have also been exposed to asbestos through the military installations, or barracks, often used for food halls, housing and workstations. Asbestos has been found in flooring tiles, roofing and ceiling materials, and insulation. Although the use of asbestos was banned by the Military in the mid-1970s, many asbestos-containing barracks, vehicles and ships remained in use for years.

Asbestos Exposure in the U.S. Air Force

Like other branches of the Military, Air Force veterans are also at risk for developing mesothelioma and other asbestos disease due to exposure during their service. Because of its durability, low cost and heat resistance, asbestos products were commonly used in the construction of Air Force bases, inside planes and in radar stations.

In 2012, the Center for Disease Control (CDC) conducted a study on Air Force facilities that revealed the presence of asbestos in vinyl flooring, floor tile, ceiling tiles, pipe insulation, stucco, drywall and asbestos cement in wall insulation. Asbestos was also heavily used in the construction of Air Force planes and has been discovered in cockpit heating systems, brakes, torque valves, heat shields for engines, gaskets, insulation and electrical wiring.